Free 4K Lower Third After Effects Templates for Filmmakers

Great Free Lower Third Templates for use in your films/vids.

Just in time for the summer’s end, which usually signals the post production phase of vids shot over the summer, the folks over at Rocketstock have been busy. They have put together a great pack of 24 free 4K Lower thirds. The fully customizable After Effects templates are useable in any version of Ae (cs6 – CC) and professional created. Get the pack by following the download button below.

 

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“Save me Obi Wan!” Red announces holographic display smartphone

Red Camera launches “Star Wars” $1200 holographic display smartphone bills it as the World’s First Holographic Media Machine.

Hollywood camera manufacturer Red recently announced its first foray into the crowded smartphone market with Hydrogen One, an Android device with a 5.7″ display. That screen is the center of attention in the limited information Red has provided, emphasizing its ability to switch from a traditional 2D display to a 3D/VR/AR/holographic display thanks to ‘nanotechnology.

As with RED, modular and marketing go hand in hand so expect the product go through updates as far as specs before the launch date and of course rely on numerous add-ons to achieve some of its loftier goals. Red states that the Hydrogen One will integrate with its family of professional video cameras as a monitor and user interface for Scarlet, Weapon and Epic cameras. It will also offer a proprietary algorithm to convert stereo sound into ‘multi-dimensional audio,’ a microSD card slot and USB-C charging port.

Read the entire dpreview article here or download pdf 

MadWerkz has been a RED workflow boutique since 2008, Check out MadWerkz other RED post or contact us for more information

ARRI debuts TOTALLY wireless camera, the SXT W

All you need to know – The ALEXA SXT W is totally wireless. Wireless Video, WiFi and wireless camera/lens control are all built in.

For those lucky enough to be able get your hands on these beauties, the candy shop is open.

ARRI has integrated a high-quality, low-latency (no delay) HD video transmitter and a WiFi radio into the new ALEXA SXT W model. Having a video transmitter built in makes the camera smaller, lighter and less cluttered than having an external transmitter. Fewer cables is nice because how many times have you rummaged through equipment cases looking for the essential one that  you just cannot find? Camera setup can now be quicker, and the AD might even thank you for saving precious production time.

ALEXA SXT W will replace all previous SXT models. Life gets simpler: there is only one version of SXT W. Existing ALEXA SXT EV and SXT Plus owners can upgrade.

Also, the ALEXA SXT W is just one part of ARRI’s jump into the world of wireless video. Anyone can benefit from ARRI’s new WVS (Wireless Video System) even if they don’t have an ALEXA SXT W or an ALEXA SXT ready to upgrade.

ARRI WVS consists of a stand-alone video transmitter to be used with other ARRI or third-party cameras. A stand-alone video receiver works both with this transmitter or the one in an SXT W.

You can read Jon Fauer’s great article over at FDTimes here or if you’d like to get info on where to rent ARRI in the Ohio area, contact Scott Handel and the guys over at Ohio HD Video

Adobe unveils major update to Creative Cloud in time for NAB 2017

Adobe unveiled enhancements to its video offerings within Creative Cloud. The “major update” for video in Adobe Creative Cloud was designed “to help filmmakers and video producers collaborate and streamline video workflows,” it said in a news release. The Creative Cloud release delivers new features for graphics and titling, animation, polishing audio and sharing assets; support for the latest video formats, including High Dynamic Range (HDR), virtual reality (VR) and 4K; new integrations with Adobe Stock; and advanced artificial intelligence (AI) capabilities powered by Adobe Sensei, Adobe’s AI and machine learning framework.

“One of the biggest” parts of the new enhancements include Motion Graphics Templates, which he said enables After Effects users to create content and then package it for distribution so that others can “modify it, but the core essence of your creativity is simplified and shared with the masses.”

Motion Graphics Templates “now bring the power of After Effects to Premiere Pro through easy to use templates, allowing creators to add beautiful titles, animations and lower thirds to their videos and create custom motion graphics templates” that can be shared via Creative Cloud Libraries, Adobe said in the news release.

The “areas of innovation” also include greater support for HDR and 360 VR workflows, Roberts said. Machine learning and AI, meanwhile, “are a theme running through our products and you’ll see it reflected” in the updates, he said.

Adobe provided demonstrations of some of the update highlights to reporters. As examples, Patrick Palmer, senior product manager for workflows, showed how machine learning technology used in the Essential Sound Panel helps content creators improve their audio mixes. In Premiere Pro, the Essential Sound Panel “lets users make audio mixes and sound improvements that in the past would have required a dedicated session by an audio engineer,” Adobe said in the news release.

Form more information read the entire press release here

First Look, Canon’s C700 High-end Camera

Canon C700 Camera

The EOS C700 is Canon’s no-compromise, high-end, cinematography camera. Here’s some of the first available footage from it, shot by Brett Danton, in a spectacular fashion. Australian sun, luxury cars, shot from a speeding helicopter. What’s not to like?

Brett Danton and the fellows at RedShark have written an amazing review of Canon’s amazing C700 cinematography camera. Read the article at Redshark Canon C700

Watch the footage here:

Director Brett Danton

Festival Series: BluRay versus DCP

Still From Film Derby Baby
Still From Film Derby Baby

Our latest DCP was for the Indie Doc Derby Baby, produced by Dave Wruck and Robin Bond for Robin Bond Media. The film, which has no less than 100 Showtimes across the country Derby Baby showtimes, is a great project which we were proud to help get on the big screen. The film’s Producer’s contacted us seeking to find out more about the DCP option. They understood BluRay or even a HDCam tape delivery were options but they wanted to see if a DCP could be done quickly and inside the Indie Budget they were working with. One of their first questions centered not around price but around the benefits of a DCP over a BluRay.

The wide adoption of BluRay, after the HD-DVD/BluRay Wars (remember those?), gave us a standard that has allowed theater owners to offer a presentation platform of high resolution and reliability to today’s Independent Filmmaker. The ease at which a disc can be authored and played back on almost any machine, worldwide, coupled with the fact that the 1080p format scales nicely with the Digital Projection 2K standard and it’s relatively cheap disc/burner cost, make it a great tool for the filmmaker looking to release his/her film.

So why use a DCP?

First let’s answer the question, what is a DCP? DCP stands for Digital Cinema Package. In short, a DCP is the digital equivalent of a 35mm film print.   It is what you give to a commercial theater so that they can screen your movie on a digital ( also known as “D-Cinema”) projector.  Like a 35mm print, a DCP is a world-wide standard.  If you walk into any D-Cinema theater, anywhere in the world, they can play your DCP without a problem. It can handle files up to 4096k in size and runs at speeds up to 250 Mbit/s! It also operates in XYZ Colorspace rather than videos YUV/RGB Colorspace. So in short, it is made to as closely simulate the image complexity and fidelity of film as possible.

But why spend the money on a DCP? Is a DCP really that much better than a BluRay. In short, yes!

BluRay, DCP Frame compared

A BluRay gives you easy access to the 1080/24p spec, and 5.1 Dolby Surround audio. and having seen many BluRay projected films, It can look stunning given the author encodes at the highest rate allowed, color corrects with D-Cinema in mind and uses as close to master quality as they can. But even with those pluses, the BluRay has the following limitations;

  • Since the Projector screens at only 2k or 4k, any HD material will introduce bars on the sides.
  • Most likely your compression will come in somewhere around 12 to 25 Mbit/s, falling way short of the 250 allowed by the server.
  • Since there is no standard on authoring, encoding from say a H-264 web release to BluRay is allowed, meaning there is nothing to prevent you from burning your 640 x 480 scaled Youtube video to disc.
  • A mistake in the authoring process can result in an unplayable disc.
  • Films, can for the most part be copied by anyone.

DCP standardizes the process, giving the filmmaker full access to the 2048k/4096k image format, and it allows films shot in 2:35/2:40 to be projected as intended. The DCP will not be created if the source footage is not within the strict DCP spec. Another benefit is that DCPs don’t wear out like 35mm or scratch like BluRay’s.  Digital copies do not degrade, so you’ll never have a broken, scratched or dirty DCP.  The 1000th screening will look just as perfect as the first. Also as stated above, If you walk into any D-Cinema theater, anywhere in the world, they can play your DCP without a problem. Often housed in a military grade USB drive, factors such as scratching and damage from transport are nonexistent. And since the package is housed on a Linux formatted hard drive and in a muxed jpeg2000 format, copying a film is extremely difficult.

Another factor, and a very important one if you care about the look of your film or your film depends on the look to enhance audience participation, is regardless of what you deliver on, that your film will be projected in XYZ Colorspace not in the YUV/RGB Color we are all used to from our television sets. DCP’s are automatically converted to XYZ in the packaging process. DCPs and theatrical D-Cinema equipment will make well-shot and color-corrected footage look absolutely fantastic.  The color gamut and contrast are far superior to anything you’ll see on your computer monitor.

3D DCP’s are easy to encode and package. There currently is no solution below 5k for authoring 3D BluRays.

Lastly, In order to be considered for an Academy Award, your film must be delivered on either a film print or a DCP. For full specifications, go here, http://www.oscars.org/awards/academyawards/rules/digital.html

Derby Baby Logo

Derby Baby DCP
A darling film, about love, addition and ring rash, Derby Baby was turned into a DCP from a sequence of Tif files and a set of discrete 5.1 audio files. The original film was uprez’d from 720p to 2k by Dave Wruck and sent to us via a Hard Drive. The finished 90 minute film was sent to a D-Cinema in Los Angeles for screening on a CRU 100 gig hard drive. To get more information on the film, go to http://www.derbybabythefilm.com/

So what special steps do you have to do in order to prepare your film for a DCP? Contact us and we’ll gladly walk you through the steps.

The price of DCP’s have come down drastically in the last few years. The choice to go with the format used by all the major studios versus BluRay is a much easier one today. The ability to compete with the majors is now fully within your grasp. For instance, we offer dynamic packages starting around $10 per minute. Visit us at www.madwerkz.com or contact us at madwerkz for more info on creating DCP’s. Happy filming.

Joddy